Prs

Pairs Cricket

Pairs Cricket IntroThe pitch is two sets of stumps 12-16m apart, with a batting box at each end (see picture).

There are 8-12 players in a team, organised into pairs.

Each batting pair bats for 2 overs, and then the next pair of batsmen comes in.

Every fielder bowls 1 over (an over is 6 balls).

Runs are scored by changing ends with your batting partner.

If the ball is bowled wide of the box the ball is called wide and the batting team get 2 runs.

Each time a batter is out, 5 runs are deducted and the other batter faces the next ball.

A batter may be out if:

  • they or the ball hit their stumps when the ball is bowled
  • they hit the ball in the air and it is caught
  • they aren’t safely in their box when the fielders hit the stumps with the ball

The team with the most runs scored from their overs wins.

Glossary – Pairs Cricket

Boundary

The boundary is an optional limit to the playing area. This should be marked, for examples by cones or a rope. Balls hit over the boundary without bouncing score 6 runs; if they do bounce they score 4 runs. The batsman who hit the boundary should face the next ball.

Calling

When deciding if they should run or not batsman should communicate with each other by calling. The batsman who is running towards the “danger end” – the end where the ball is most likely to be thrown – should make the call: Yes or No.

Crease

This is the line that runs across the front of the batting box. Bowlers must have part of their front foot behind this line when they deliver the ball; otherwise the ball is a no-ball. This is the line batsman must have crossed to be safely in their ground.

Umpire

The umpire is responsible for calling wides and no-balls, determining if the batsman is out or not, and making sure batsmen make their ground at the non-strikers end when running. They signal their decisions to the scorer so that it can be recorded on the scoresheet. They also count the number of balls that have been bowled and call “over” once each over has been completed.

Square Leg Umpire

This umpire is responsible for helping the umpire with calling no- balls, helping determine if the batsman is out or not and making sure batsman make their ground at the strikers end. They also count the number of balls that have been bowled and help
communicate this to the other umpire.

Byes

Byes are runs scored when the batsman has missed the ball with their bat and it has not hit the batsman on the body. They are added to the team total but do not count to the batsman’s individual score.

Leg Byes

Leg Byes are runs scored when the batsman has missed the ball with their bat but the ball has touched the batsman’s body. They are added to the team total but do not count to the batsman individual score.

No Ball

If the ball bounces more than twice before reaching the batsman, or arrives above waist height without bouncing, then it will be called a no-ball. If the bowler does not have part of their front foot behind the crease when they deliver the ball it will also be called a no-ball. A ball may be called a no-ball even if the batsman hits the ball.

Wide

The ball is bowled so far wide of the batter that they cannot hit it then that ball will be called a wide. In pairs cricket this can be if the ball passes the batsman wide of the crease. If the ball is hit it cannot be called a wide.

Over

Bowlers bowl a set number of balls, called an over, before another bowler takes over. In a conventional game of cricket an over lasts 6 balls.

Innings

An innings is a unit of play in cricket. A game of cricket usually lasts for two innings, allowing both teams to have one go